Year End Campaign

As the year comes to an end the Center for Anti-Violence Education reflects on our impact over the past twelve month. We invite you to learn about the issues we deal with and the individuals we help through our work.

Please consider making a year-end gift to continue to make our work possible.

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Tristen’s first connection to the Center for Anti-Violence Education was through the empowerment self-defense program we ran at the drop-in center for homeless LGBTQ youth where he regularly showed up. He was going back and forth between living on the streets and with his sometime boyfriend. Tristen did not miss a single self-defense class and at the end of the 20-week program, he announced to our instructor that he knew he had the right to be safe. For him, this understanding was radical.

LGBTQ youth are eight times more likely to become homeless than non-LGBTQ youth. Once homeless, these young people are also eight times more likely to experience violence and harassment on the streets because of their identity. Mental health issues, anxiety, depression and suicidal thoughts are also represented in higher rates among this population. At the same time, support services for relationship violence among LGBTQ youth are limited.

Once Tristen started talking about the abusive relationship he was in, he created a safety plan, built up his courage and figured out how to safely leave that relationship. This was three years ago. Despite some ongoing ups and downs,Tristen went on to train as one of our Pride Protectors - a youth leader who builds tools to de-escalate violence, and gains experience as an activist, learning to speak up and speak out for the safety of others. Tristen looks back and says that what made all of it possible, was what he gained through that first 20-week program - awareness of his self-worth, self-esteem and knowledge of his rights to be safe.

At the Center for Anti-Violence Education we know that everyone has a right to feel safe, regardless of their gender, sexual orientation, religion, ability, place of birth, or race. Please give to help us make that right a reality for everyone.

  Tina, 16   Tina was 16 when she took her first empowerment self-defense class at the Center for Anti-Violence Education (CAE). She was quiet but engaged, and went on to join our weekly teen after-school program. Within a year, she had become an advocate of self-care and healing. Tina created a handbook of mental health resources and hotlines that she distributed around her school. She also did a presentation around anti-violence strategies in one of her classes and participated in a range of social actions with CAE peers.  It wasn’t until CAE’s domestic violence speak out that Tina came forward and quietly took the microphone. With the courage and strength CAE helped her find, she felt empowered to publicly reveal the abuse she endured. Tina is not alone. While there are a staggering 3.5 million reported cases of childhood familial abuse, the unreported cases make this number even higher. And the consequence of silence is pernicious. Not only does perpetration continue, but it reduces the likelihood that survivors access help. It also makes children that much more vulnerable to re-victimization and abuse as they enter adulthood. CAE’s approach to disrupting violence is empowerment self-defense and self-care, and connecting personal experiences of violence to social action and activism.  Today, Tina is getting the support she needs. She is also a CAE Peer Educator, building resilience and coping skills through trusting relationships and through social action: she's sharing her story and training other teens as Upstanders to violence. When we asked Tina what made her share her story that first time, she said, "I always feel safe and like I’m powerful when I’m at CAE.” Join us in helping Tina and thousands of others like her who look to CAE for support.

Tina, 16

Tina was 16 when she took her first empowerment self-defense class at the Center for Anti-Violence Education (CAE). She was quiet but engaged, and went on to join our weekly teen after-school program. Within a year, she had become an advocate of self-care and healing. Tina created a handbook of mental health resources and hotlines that she distributed around her school. She also did a presentation around anti-violence strategies in one of her classes and participated in a range of social actions with CAE peers.

It wasn’t until CAE’s domestic violence speak out that Tina came forward and quietly took the microphone. With the courage and strength CAE helped her find, she felt empowered to publicly reveal the abuse she endured. Tina is not alone. While there are a staggering 3.5 million reported cases of childhood familial abuse, the unreported cases make this number even higher. And the consequence of silence is pernicious. Not only does perpetration continue, but it reduces the likelihood that survivors access help. It also makes children that much more vulnerable to re-victimization and abuse as they enter adulthood. CAE’s approach to disrupting violence is empowerment self-defense and self-care, and connecting personal experiences of violence to social action and activism.

Today, Tina is getting the support she needs. She is also a CAE Peer Educator, building resilience and coping skills through trusting relationships and through social action: she's sharing her story and training other teens as Upstanders to violence. When we asked Tina what made her share her story that first time, she said, "I always feel safe and like I’m powerful when I’m at CAE.” Join us in helping Tina and thousands of others like her who look to CAE for support.